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Morpho brilliance


Morpho brilliance
Photo Information
Copyright: ROBERTO INTILE (rintile) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 979 W: 66 N: 2708] (15972)
Genre: Places
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2007-11-18
Categories: Nature
Exposure: f/5.6, 1/60 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2007-11-27 18:36
Viewed: 1279
Points: 10
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
A Morpho butterfly may be one of over 80 described species of the genus Morpho. They are neotropical butterflies found mostly in South America as well as Mexico and Central America. Morphos range in wingspan from the 7.5 cm (3 inch) M. rhodopteron to the imposing 20 cm (8 inch) Sunset Morpho, M. hecuba. The name Morpho derives from its use as an epithet of Aphrodite/Venus.

Many Morpho butterflies are colored in metallic, shimmering shades of blue and green. These colors are not a result of pigmentation but rather are an example of iridescence: the extremely fine lamellated scales covering the Morpho's wings reflect incident light repeatedly at successive layers, leading to interference effects that depend on both wavelength and angle of incidence/observance. Thus the colors produced vary with viewing angle, however they are actually surprisingly uniform, perhaps due to the tetrahedral (diamond-like) structural arrangement of the scales or diffraction from overlying cell layers. This structure may be called a photonic crystal. The iridescent lamellae are present on the dorsal side of their wings only, leaving the ventral side a drab brown.

The ventral side is decorated with ocelli or eyespots. In some species, such as M. godarti, the dorsal lamellae are so thin as to allow the ventral ocelli to peek through. While not all Morphos have iridescent coloration, they all have ocelli. In most species only the males are colorful, a fact supporting the theory that the coloration is used for intrasexual communication between males. The lamellae reflect up to 70% of light falling on them, including any UV. The eyes of Morpho butterflies are thought to be highly sensitive to UV light and therefore the males are able to see each other from great distances. Some South American species are reportedly visible by the human eye up to one kilometer away.

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Critiques [Translate]

I see! Good you mention it! I find the colors very nice... I'm more impress now i know what it is and the angle you take it!
Excellent presentation!

Hola Roberto,
Muy buen experimento, me gusta el efecto de tu fotografia.

Saludos,

Iris

  • Great 
  • ayse51 Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2092 W: 144 N: 2110] (27563)
  • [2007-11-28 2:58]

Hi Roberto,
beautiful colours...Frame is also....You are master of master.TFS.Necla.

Hi Roberto: Its a very interesting pov of the wing of the morpho...... I have seen them at a butterfly conservatory and the are beautiful.. Here the Blue looks like a gas flame ... the note is excellent..........thanks Roberto:0)

Hi Roberto:
A very interesting abstract nature presentation:)
Well done !!!
David
:)lt.

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