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myth of the cave


myth of the cave
Photo Information
Copyright: gianfranco calzarano (baddori) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 65 W: 5 N: 174] (1351)
Genre: Places
Medium: Color
Date Taken: 2014-12-01
Categories: Architecture
Camera: Nikon D80
Exposure: f/4.5, 1/200 seconds
More Photo Info: [view]
Photo Version: Original Version
Date Submitted: 2014-12-04 10:38
Viewed: 610
Points: 2
[Note Guidelines] Photographer's Note
The Allegory of the Cave (also titled Analogy of the Cave, Plato's Cave or Parable of the Cave) is presented by the Greek philosopher Plato in his work The Republic (514a520a) to compare "...the effect of education (παιδεία) and the lack of it on our nature". It is written as a dialogue between Plato's brother Glaucon and his mentor Socrates, narrated by the latter. The allegory is presented after the Analogy of the Sun (508b509c) and the Analogy of the Divided Line (509d513e). All three are characterized in relation to dialectic at the end of Books VII and VIII (531d534e).

The allegory may be related to Plato's Theory of Forms, according to which the "Forms" (or "Ideas"), and not the material world of change known to us through sensation, possess the highest and most fundamental kind of reality. Only knowledge of the Forms constitutes real knowledge. Socrates informs Glaucon that the most excellent must learn the greatest of all studies, which is to behold the Good. Those who have ascended to this highest level, however, must not remain there but must return to the cave and dwell with the prisoners, sharing in their labors and honors.

Plato's Phaedo contains similar imagery to that of the allegory of the Cave; a philosopher recognizes that before philosophy, his soul was "a veritable prisoner fast bound within his body... and that instead of investigating reality by itself and in itself it is compelled to peer through the bars of its prison.

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Hi,

Nice picture. Good balance between lighting and shadows.

Kishore

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